Successful Trader's Cheat Sheet
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Never heard about Rob Booker. But if you interested in price action trading, Ichimoku trading & other PA based trading I would like to suggest Chris Capre for you. Because I completed few courses under him. Google 2ndskilesforex. Hopefully you can get to know more about him and there are loads of free articles, videos,analysis & other materials available there.
Currency prices are constantly moving, so the trader may decide to hold the position overnight. The broker will rollover the position, resulting in a credit or debit based on the interest rate differential between the Eurozone and the U.S. If the Eurozone has an interest rate of 4% and the U.S. has an interest rate of 3%, the trader owns the higher interest rate currency because they bought EUR. Therefore, at rollover, the trader should receive a small credit. If the EUR interest rate was lower than the USD rate then the trader would be debited at rollover.

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An investor can profit from the difference between two interest rates in two different economies by buying the currency with the higher interest rate and shorting the currency with the lower interest rate. Prior to the 2008 financial crisis, it was very common to short the Japanese yen (JPY) and buy British pounds (GBP) because the interest rate differential was very large. This strategy is sometimes referred to as a "carry trade."
Currency trading was very difficult for individual investors prior to the internet. Most currency traders were large multinational corporations, hedge funds or high-net-worth individuals because forex trading required a lot of capital. With help from the internet, a retail market aimed at individual traders has emerged, providing easy access to the foreign exchange markets, either through the banks themselves or brokers making a secondary market. Most online brokers or dealers offer very high leverage to individual traders who can control a large trade with a small account balance.

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One unique aspect of this international market is that there is no central marketplace for foreign exchange. Rather, currency trading is conducted electronically over-the-counter (OTC), which means that all transactions occur via computer networks between traders around the world, rather than on one centralized exchange. The market is open 24 hours a day, five and a half days a week, and currencies are traded worldwide in the major financial centers of London, New York, Tokyo, Zurich, Frankfurt, Hong Kong, Singapore, Paris and Sydney—across almost every time zone. This means that when the trading day in the U.S. ends, the forex market begins anew in Tokyo and Hong Kong. As such, the forex market can be extremely active any time of the day, with price quotes changing constantly.
A single pound on Monday could get you 1.19 euros. On Tuesday, 1.20 euros. This tiny change may not seem like a big deal. But think of it on a bigger scale. A large international company may need to pay overseas employees. Imagine what that could do to the bottom line if, like in the example above, simply exchanging one currency for another costs you more depending on when you do it? These few pennies add up quickly. In both cases, you—as a traveler or a business owner—may want to hold your money until the forex exchange rate is more favorable.
Trading foreign exchange on margin carries a high level of risk, and may not be suitable for everyone. Before deciding to trade foreign exchange you should carefully consider your investment objectives, level of experience, and risk appetite. Remember, you could sustain a loss of some or all of your initial investment, which means that you should not invest money that you cannot afford to lose. If you have any doubts, it is advisable to seek advice from an independent financial advisor.
As soon as you get it, you’ll want to tear it open. Inside, you’ll find a flash drive with some confidential information we simply can’t release online. There’s an exclusive one-on-one interview with penny stock legend Tim Sykes… and some other surprises. And of course, it’s where you’ll find your Exotics Club Founder Membership Card, personally signed by me.
The broker basically resets the positions and provides either a credit or debit for the interest rate differential between the two currencies in the pairs being held. The trade carries on and the trader doesn't need to deliver or settle the transaction. When the trade is closed the trader realizes their profit or loss based on their original transaction price and the price they closed the trade at. The rollover credits or debits could either add to this gain or detract from it.
Rob Booker is a forex seminar entertainer, a forex "systems" marketer and he is not a successful trader. I can say this from plenty of personal experience: I attended two of his seminars, co-taught another one with him in Canada, and am mentioned in his book. Once Rob held a contest to see who could submit the most profitable system. A guy wrote an elaborate description of a "winning system" and submitted it, knowing full well that it was a system that was a guaranteed loser. Rob awarded him first place, lol, and never tested the system! Rob makes nearly all of his (big) money from selling systems-of-the-month (stuff you can easily find online.) He has not been seen on FF since professional trader Phil McGrew (look him up here--his posts are gold) made him his "buddy" and would speak the truth whenever Rob would post. Stay far away from this clown.
Get his custom indicators. There's 2 of them. One of which plots all daily, weekly and monthly pivots that have ever been on the chart, and marks which ones were "missed" on the day/week/month they were formed. These are important, because he noticed ages ago that when price misses a pivot because it is moving strongly in one direction, it has a tendency to retrace towards that pivot when that driver runs out of steam. Relative to the time frame we're talking about
Any forex transaction that settles for a date later than spot is considered a "forward." The price is calculated by adjusting the spot rate to account for the difference in interest rates between the two currencies. The amount of adjustment is called "forward points." The forward points reflect only the interest rate differential between two markets. They are not a forecast of how the spot market will trade at a date in the future.
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