Successful Trader's Cheat Sheet
Give me the CHEAT SHEET!
Successful Trader's Cheat Sheet - NO

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So far, so good. I saw good consistent gains the first 2 months I used it. Remarkably consistent actually. About 4-6% per week for about 9 weeks in a row. Which was encouraging. Then, however, I got a bit cocky and went in way too big on a long NZD/USD trade about 2 months ago, and I've been fighting my way out of it ever since. But that was really my own fault. There's no reason I should have ended up in a position where I had a loss so big I couldn't manage my way out, if I had been following the rules.
Rob Booker is a forex seminar entertainer, a forex "systems" marketer and he is not a successful trader. I can say this from plenty of personal experience: I attended two of his seminars, co-taught another one with him in Canada, and am mentioned in his book. Once Rob held a contest to see who could submit the most profitable system. A guy wrote an elaborate description of a "winning system" and submitted it, knowing full well that it was a system that was a guaranteed loser. Rob awarded him first place, lol, and never tested the system! Rob makes nearly all of his (big) money from selling systems-of-the-month (stuff you can easily find online.) He has not been seen on FF since professional trader Phil McGrew (look him up here--his posts are gold) made him his "buddy" and would speak the truth whenever Rob would post. Stay far away from this clown.
The indicators are free (you can find them on his website), and technically there is no reason you can't use his strategies without paying him money. But I made back the $27 in one or two trades, so I'm not fussed. Watching his videos and talking to other Trifecta users has a lot of value though. Rob himself is quite active in the community and always happy to answer questions. In general he seems like a really nice guy, if sometimes annoyingly enthusiastic. He'll happily give you advice on a trade, even if it's not one of his.

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Factors like interest rates, trade flows, tourism, economic strength and geopolitical risk affect supply and demand for currencies, which creates daily volatility in the forex markets. An opportunity exists to profit from changes that may increase or reduce one currency's value compared to another. A forecast that one currency will weaken is essentially the same as assuming that the other currency in the pair will strengthen because currencies are traded as pairs.
Most brokers also provide leverage. Many brokers in the U.S. provide leverage up to 50:1. Let's assume our trader uses 10:1 leverage on this transaction. If using 10:1 leverage the trader is not required to have $5,000 in their account, even though they are trading $5,000 worth of currency. They only need $500. As long as they have $500 and 10:1 leverage they can trade $5,000 worth of currency. If they utilize 20:1 leverage, they only need $250 in their account (because $250 * 20 = $5,000).

Interesting. Rob is one high-profile forex 'guru' I've been loosely following for several years, and he seems to flit from system to system. For example, a few years back he was very enthusiastic about a system he called the Hopper (which was little more than a MACD crossover) which he was touting with his ladyfriend Jennifer Thornburg (who likes to write articles about Sex and Trading, btw). More recently Rob's been promoting EAs, including some that take profit quickly while allowing floating losses to snowball. Given all of this, I've never bought anything that he's been offering, and I've found it difficult to take him completely seriously.

When trading in the forex market, you're buying or selling the currency of a particular country, relative to another currency. But there's no physical exchange of money from one party to another. That's what happens at a foreign exchange kiosk—think of a tourist visiting Times Square in New York City from Japan. He may be converting his physical yen to actual U.S. dollar cash (and may be charged a commission fee to do so) so he can spend his money while he's traveling. But in the world of electronic markets, traders are usually taking a position in a specific currency, with the hope that there will be some upward movement and strength in the currency they're buying (or weakness if they're selling) so they can make a profit. 


More specifically, the spot market is where currencies are bought and sold according to the current price. That price, determined by supply and demand, is a reflection of many things, including current interest rates, economic performance, sentiment towards ongoing political situations (both locally and internationally), as well as the perception of the future performance of one currency against another. When a deal is finalized, this is known as a "spot deal". It is a bilateral transaction by which one party delivers an agreed-upon currency amount to the counter party and receives a specified amount of another currency at the agreed-upon exchange rate value. After a position is closed, the settlement is in cash. Although the spot market is commonly known as one that deals with transactions in the present (rather than the future), these trades actually take two days for settlement.

From a historical standpoint, foreign exchange trading was largely limited to governments, large companies, and hedge funds. But in today's world, trading currencies is as easy as a click of a mouse. Accessibility is not an issue, which means anyone can do it. Many investment firms, banks, and retail forex brokers offer the chance for individuals to open accounts and to trade currencies. 


Most retail investors should spend time investigating a forex dealer to find out whether it is regulated in the U.S. or the U.K. (dealers in the U.S. and U.K. have more oversight) or in a country with lax rules and oversight. It is also a good idea to find out what kind of account protections are available in case of a market crisis, or if a dealer becomes insolvent.
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