Successful Trader's Cheat Sheet
Give me the CHEAT SHEET!
Successful Trader's Cheat Sheet - NO

Oh yeah Tim - once I saw Robs post that he "didn't find second best trader here" and a picture of barclays bank this was a big red warning for me - Rob is so stupid that he can't even see difference between "barclay hedge" and barclays bank - any serious trader wold know this - so I bet with everything I have Rob is NOT a trader and NEVER traded profitably. So cheap of you to attack Jarrett - it is you who look like an idiot not Jarrett
These articles, on the other hand, discuss currency trading as buying and selling currency on the foreign exchange (or "Forex") market with the intent to make money, often called "speculative forex trading". XE does not offer speculative forex trading, nor do we recommend any firms that offer this service. These articles are provided for general information only.
Unlike stock markets, which can trace their roots back centuries, the forex market as we understand it today is a truly new market. Of course, in its most basic sense - that of people converting one currency to another for financial advantage - forex has been around since nations began minting currencies. But the modern forex markets are a modern invention. After the accord at Bretton Woods in 1971, more major currencies were allowed to float freely against one another. The values of individual currencies vary, which has given rise to the need for foreign exchange services and trading.

So far, so good. I saw good consistent gains the first 2 months I used it. Remarkably consistent actually. About 4-6% per week for about 9 weeks in a row. Which was encouraging. Then, however, I got a bit cocky and went in way too big on a long NZD/USD trade about 2 months ago, and I've been fighting my way out of it ever since. But that was really my own fault. There's no reason I should have ended up in a position where I had a loss so big I couldn't manage my way out, if I had been following the rules.


An investor can profit from the difference between two interest rates in two different economies by buying the currency with the higher interest rate and shorting the currency with the lower interest rate. Prior to the 2008 financial crisis, it was very common to short the Japanese yen (JPY) and buy British pounds (GBP) because the interest rate differential was very large. This strategy is sometimes referred to as a "carry trade."
{quote} Interesting. Rob is one high-profile forex 'guru' I've been watching for several years, and he seems to flit from system to system. For example, a few years back he was very enthusiastic about a system he called the Hopper (which was little more than a MACD crossover) which he was touting with his ladyfriend Jennifer Thornburg (who likes to write articles about Sex and Trading, btw). More recently Rob's been promoting EAs, including some that take profit quickly while allowing floating losses to...
The blender company could have reduced this risk by shorting the euro and buying the USD when they were at parity. That way, if the dollar rose in value, the profits from the trade would offset the reduced profit from the sale of blenders. If the USD fell in value, the more favorable exchange rate will increase the profit from the sale of blenders, which offsets the losses in the trade.
When trading in the forex market, you're buying or selling the currency of a particular country, relative to another currency. But there's no physical exchange of money from one party to another. That's what happens at a foreign exchange kiosk—think of a tourist visiting Times Square in New York City from Japan. He may be converting his physical yen to actual U.S. dollar cash (and may be charged a commission fee to do so) so he can spend his money while he's traveling. But in the world of electronic markets, traders are usually taking a position in a specific currency, with the hope that there will be some upward movement and strength in the currency they're buying (or weakness if they're selling) so they can make a profit. 
Modeled after successful motor clubs in Europe and the coastal United States, Houston Motor Club is not a car rental company or a “one-day driving experience”. Rather, we are a private, members-only club that exists for the sole purpose of affording our members with exclusive access to the club’s fleet of vehicles. It is an experience like no other.
So far, so good. I saw good consistent gains the first 2 months I used it. Remarkably consistent actually. About 4-6% per week for about 9 weeks in a row. Which was encouraging. Then, however, I got a bit cocky and went in way too big on a long NZD/USD trade about 2 months ago, and I've been fighting my way out of it ever since. But that was really my own fault. There's no reason I should have ended up in a position where I had a loss so big I couldn't manage my way out, if I had been following the rules.

High Risk Investment Notice: Trading Forex/CFDs on margin carries a high level of risk and may not be suitable for all investors. The products are intended for retail, professional, and eligible counterparty clients. Retail clients who maintain account(s) with Forex Capital Markets Limited ("FXCM LTD") could sustain a total loss of deposited funds but are not subject to subsequent payment obligations beyond the deposited funds but professional clients and eligible counterparty clients could sustain losses in excess of deposits. Prior to trading any products offered by FXCM LTD, inclusive of all EU branches, any affiliates of aforementioned firms, or other firms within the FXCM group of companies [collectively the "FXCM Group"], carefully consider your financial situation and experience level. The FXCM Group may provide general commentary, which is not intended as investment advice and must not be construed as such. Seek advice from a separate financial advisor. The FXCM Group assumes no liability for errors, inaccuracies or omissions; does not warrant the accuracy, completeness of information, text, graphics, links or other items contained within these materials. Read and understand the Terms and Conditions on the FXCM Group's websites prior to taking further action.
Since the market is made by each of the participating banks providing offers and bids for a particular currency, the market pricing mechanism is based on supply and demand. Because there are such large trade flows within the system, it is difficult for rogue traders to influence the price of a currency. This system helps create transparency in the market for investors with access to interbank dealing.

rob booker 100 challenge


Most retail investors should spend time investigating a forex dealer to find out whether it is regulated in the U.S. or the U.K. (dealers in the U.S. and U.K. have more oversight) or in a country with lax rules and oversight. It is also a good idea to find out what kind of account protections are available in case of a market crisis, or if a dealer becomes insolvent.
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